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oregano in vodka

Oregano TIncture For Colds and Flu

Disclaimer:  The instructions I offer here in this post (and in all my posts about herbs and home remedies) are what I use personally at home. Of course the standard disclaimer goes: I am not a doctor and don’t prescribe medicines or herbs, this is just what  we have done here for generations with great results.    oregano in vodka

I learned from Shannon over at Nourishing Days that Oregano Oil can be used to treat colds and flu. I already use elderberry tincture for that so I did some research and decided to make Oregano Oil using the organic oregano in my garden and some cheapo vodka.

In the interest of full disclosure, that elderberry tincture? Man it burns going down.  So I put it in a cup of Earl Grey tea and its almost palatable.  Blech. But it works. 

Oregano tincture may be nearly as bad but I will make it. Since we don’t have small children here any longer, we can man up and take it.

Pack a quart jar with fresh oregano, pour some kind of spirits over it like brandy or vodka. Let it sit in the dark about 6 weeks. Strain it and store it in dark bottles or in a dark place like a frig or cellar.

The dosage varies depending on who you talk to but, like most herbal tinctures, I think 1 teaspoon (1 teaspoon = 12.5 mg.) three times a day for adults would work nicely. Children’s dosage should probably be figured according to Clark’s Rule or Young’s Rule.

 

Baby Doll Quilt Kit Instructions

Baby Doll Quilt Kit Instructions
by Wardee Harmon


My B. and her doll quilt that inspired this kit you can make and give as a gift!

This is a quilt kit meant for young ladies who are still young enough for enjoying dolls, and are beginning to learn to quilt. In fact, I have shared a doll quilt made by my daughter B. using this pattern. But recently, I assembled together the ingredients for making this quilt to give as a kit — to a young lady we know on the occasion of her birthday. Our young friend’s mother is the one who gave me the idea for making this doll quilt into a kit when she shared that her daughter would really like to make a doll quilt.

What you’ll need to gather together are these supplies:

• (25) 5-inch squares total of 4 or 5 types of fabric
• 28″ x 28″ square of back fabric
• 28″ x 28″ square of unbleached cotton batting
• (3) 2″ x 40 to 45″ strips of fabric for the binding
• Embroidery crochet thread for tying

dollquiltkitpiecesweb.jpg

Put it all together, with instructions (below), and it is ready for gift giving!

dollquiltkitdoneweb.jpg

The recipient will need to supply thread, a sewing machine, scissors, and pins.

© Copyright 2008 by Wardee Harmon. Used with permission from the author.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~The following are the instructions for the Baby Doll Quilt Kit (To Teach Keepers(TM), Jan-Feb-Mar 2008).

Cut and paste the following. Please include the copyright information at the end when passing these instructions on with your gift. The instructions are for personal, not commercial, use only.
Baby Doll Quilt Kit Instructions

Included

• (25) 5-inch squares total of 4 or 5 types of fabric
• 28″ x 28″ square of back fabric
• 28″ x 28″ square of unbleached cotton batting
• (3) 2″ x 40″ to 45″ strips of fabric for the binding
• Embroidery crochet thread for tying

You Also Need

• Thread
• Sewing Machine
• Scissors
• Pins

1. Decide on Arrangement

Arrange the fabric squares as you prefer. Leave them in place throughout the process of piecing the top. As rows are completed, return them to their original position.

2. Construct the Rows

Take the 1st square from the 1st row right side up and lay the 2nd square from the 1st row face down on top of it. Sew them together along the right side, using 1/4″ seam allowance. Press the seam allowance to one side.

Lay the 2 squares open and flat. Take the 3rd square from the 1st row and place it face down on top of the 2nd square. Sew these two squares together along the right side, again using 1/4″ seam allowance. Press the seam allowance to the same side.

Repeat until all the squares from the 1st row are attached together. Repeat for all rows, alternating the direction you press the seam allowances. For instance, if they are pressed to the right in Row 1, then press them to the left in Row 2, and so on.

3. Sew the Rows Together

The rows are still lined up in their original placement from Step 1, although now they are sewn together. Fold Row 1 face down on top of Row 2 (Row 2 face up underneath Row 1 being face down). Pin along the top, paying special attention to where all the seams meet. Sew the rows together, using 1/4″ seam allowance, trying to make the seams line up as best as you can — Mom may need to help with this step. Press the seam allowance to one side.

Lay Row 1 and Row 2 (now sewn together) open and flat. Take Row 3 and fold it up on top of Row 3 (so that is face down on top of Row 2). Pin them together along the bottom, once again paying special attention to where the seams meet. Again with mom’s help, sew these two rows together, using 1/4″ seam allowance, trying to make the seams line up as best as you can. Press the seam allowance in the opposite direction.

Repeat this process until all 5 rows are attached together.

4. Arrange the Layers

Lay the backing fabric face down on a clear floor or table. Lay the batting over it and follow that with the quilt top facing up. Starting from the center and radiating out, safety pin all the layers together by putting one pin in the center of each square.

5. Machine-Quilt, Hand-Quilt, or Thread Tie the Layers Together

You have some choices here.

You can use a straight stitch either on your sewing machine or by hand, and “stitch in the ditch” along all the seam lines of the quilt top. If you have a wave stitch on your sewing machine, you might want to use it (stitch width at 3 and stitch length at 3 to 4) along all the seam lines. The wave stitch is very forgiving because it isn’t meant to go straight. In addition, it looks cute and whimsical, as a doll quilt should be. When machine-quilting, remember to smooth the fabric outward as you stitch.

When machine quilting, stitch the inner seams first and radiate outward, in order to prevent lumps. For instance, start stitching along a middle seam and add parallel lines of wave stitching until you reach the right edge of the quilt top. Then turn the quilt around 180 degrees and add parallel lines of wave stitching until you reach the edge of the quilt top again. Then turn the quilt 90 degrees. Starting in the middle again, add parallel lines of stitching out to the right edge of the quilt top. Now you have only to turn it around 180 degrees for the last time and work your way from the middle to the other edge.

Note: If you stitch each line starting at just off the quilt top and ends just off the quilt top, there is no need to back-stitch. When the binding is added, all those seams will be crossed, securing them.

The final option is to add a tie through all the layers at all the corners where the quilt top squares meet.

6. Create the Binding

Here’s where Mom will possibly have to step in. Take the (3) 2″ strips.

Right sides together, place the end of one strip perpendicular to the end of another strip, with each strip set in 1/4″ from the end of the other strip. Sew a diagonal seam to join the two strips so that they are now one long continuous straight strip. Now add the third 2″ strip in the same manner to one end of the already joined strips.

Trim the excess of both join seams, leaving a 1/4″ seam allowance. Press seams open. Fold and press the long strip in half lengthwise, with wrong sides together. This is the binding.

7. Attach the Binding

Start attaching the binding in the middle of the bottom side of the quilt, not at a corner. Align the binding strip right sides together with the edge of the quilt, raw edges even. Fold over the beginning raw edge of the binding approximately one inch. Begin sewing 1/2″ from the fold.

Sew the binding to the first side of the quilt, through all layers, 1/4″ from the raw edge. Stop sewing 1/4″ before the corner. Backstitch and remove the quilt from the sewing machine.

Clip threads. Fold the binding strip up away from the quilt and make a diagonal fold. Hold the diagonal fold in place with your finger, while bringing the binding down so the raw edges of the binding are aligned with the next side of the quilt and stitch this side.

Repeat this technique around all sides, until you approach the beginning of the binding. Cut the binding end so that it will overlap the beginning binding by 1/2″ to 3/4″. Sew in place.

Backstitch and remove the quilt from the sewing machine. Clip threads. Press open.

Trim away the extra backing and batting, leaving 1/4″. Turn and press the binding to the back side.

You have two choices for finishing here. You may hand-stitch the binding in place, covering the machine stitches and the raw edges of all layers with the folded edge of the binding.

Or, you may use the sewing machine’s wave stitch (stitch width at about 2 and stitch length at about 3 to 4) to sew it down. In this case, stitch close to the folded edge of the binding on the back side, all the way around the four sides. Remember that the wave stitch is wide, so leave enough room for the stitching to wave back and forth, all the while remaining on the binding. It can barely cross into the backing, but try to keep it primarily on the binding.

Now you’ve made your baby doll a nice quilt of her own!

© Copyright 2008 by Wardee Harmon. Personal, not commerical, use is permitted by the author.